took a tumble
taking life one step at a time
took a tumble
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fireandlunch:

Proper Daario…because it had to be done. 
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rosalarian:

lenoralenoire:

This is really powerful.

Oh my god, this is such a perfect way to make a statement.
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dazily:

I went to this book store and their books were wrapped up in paper with small descriptions so no one would “judge a book by its cover” Instagram: @freyahaley x
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"I am constantly perplexed and annoyed by the persistent bias against female bosses. Even many feminist women will unleash a torrent of misogynist tropes at the mere mention of female colleagues: Women are terrible bosses; female colleagues are the worst; women are back-stabbing, catty, two-faced, incompetent, etc.

This has not been my experience. I have had multiple female bosses, and I have loved working for all of them.

My first job out of college started as a temporary position at a reception desk. When I started, the president (a man) and vice-president (a woman) of the firm were traveling out of the office for a few days. I was told they’d be calling in for messages, and I was warned—repeatedly—that the vice-president, Helene, was a dragon lady, a bitch, a holy terror. The nicest way it was put to me is that she was “difficult.” I was admonished to be very careful about how I gave her messages to her, because she would destroy me if I made a mistake.

I made sure to provide her messages in precisely the way I’d been instructed, and she was perfectly polite to me over the phone. But, by the time she was due back in the office, I’d been warned about her so many times, in so many blunt and nasty ways, that I was, frankly, terrified of her.

Helene returned to the office one morning, an hour late as I would discover was her habit. She was a beautiful, fashionable, confident woman. She introduced herself brusquely, but welcomed me to the team. I was intimidated by the sheer force of her presence, but she seemed nice enough. I waited for the other shoe to drop, for the dragon lady to reveal herself.

That day never came.

Within a couple of months, my position had been made permanent, and I was quickly promoted to an assistant position in Helene’s department. Helene was tough. She had high expectations of me. But she was also an incredibly generous mentor. I was eager to learn, and she was keen to teach me. She wanted things done a certain way, but she was open to suggestions and encouraged me to challenge her. And if I ever came up with a better way to do something, she was grateful for the idea and let me know she was proud of me. She never took credit for my ideas; to the contrary, she championed me.

By the time I left, I was the director of her department, and I had my own office overlooking Lake Michigan. From reception to an executive office in five years. And it was in no small part because of Helene’s eminent willingness to teach, support, and empower me.

The thing is, Helene could indeed be “difficult.” But not with me. She was “difficult” with the male executives who treated her like shit, with the male staff who undermined her authority. She was “difficult” with people who treated her, the only female executive at the firm, fundamentally differently than they treated the men.

Funny that I developed a reputation for being “difficult,” too.

This has been my experience working for and with “difficult” women. I’m sure there are shitty female bosses in the world; of course there are. But lots of what supposedly constitutes a “difficult” female boss, or colleague, is frequently a reflection of dynamics to which she’s reacting.

Dynamics like the one in which people reject female bosses, instead of rejecting workplace misogyny."
Melissa McEwan, Who’s the Boss? (via dee-lirious)
The Importance of Mary Sue
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humansofnewyork:

"I once threw a pen at a kid’s head for raising his hand in class and saying that PMS should disqualify women from leadership positions."
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feedmyaddictionnow:

kingofwesteros:

Publicity done right in an anti-rape campaign: double-page spread, pages glued to one another. After the reader forcefully separates them, the image above is revealed with the caption “if you have to use force, it’s rape”.

THIS IS BRILLIANT
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neuromaencer:

original source missing
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cross-connect:

Emir Özşahin - Pastel Deaths

I’ve lost a very close friend three years ago. I couldn’t get out of my head the image of her body covered with newspapers. While I was trying to get rid of this image, I realized that the image of her alive was fading away as well. Her last photograph shouldn’t have been like that. Or I shouldn’t have seen that photograph.
I started to think about death. I tried to make into a project how it would positively affect me to remember the deceased in the future from visual, perceptive and emotional points of view. 
This project is actually about what the deceased leave behind, how the ones left behind remember them or want to remember them more than those who pass away. With the naïve frames I will try to create, it’s about how my subconscious processes them, about the reality we know and how we try to forget what happens after death. 
By humanizing deceased animals and showing them as if they were sleeping, I tried to briefly touch death and create a series of photographs about pushing away the feeling of disappearing before it hits us hard in the face. 
I’m seriously not sure if this is an escape or an acceptance for me. All I know is that the photographs have a positive effect on me.

- Emir Özşahin
cross-connect:

Emir Özşahin - Pastel Deaths

I’ve lost a very close friend three years ago. I couldn’t get out of my head the image of her body covered with newspapers. While I was trying to get rid of this image, I realized that the image of her alive was fading away as well. Her last photograph shouldn’t have been like that. Or I shouldn’t have seen that photograph.
I started to think about death. I tried to make into a project how it would positively affect me to remember the deceased in the future from visual, perceptive and emotional points of view. 
This project is actually about what the deceased leave behind, how the ones left behind remember them or want to remember them more than those who pass away. With the naïve frames I will try to create, it’s about how my subconscious processes them, about the reality we know and how we try to forget what happens after death. 
By humanizing deceased animals and showing them as if they were sleeping, I tried to briefly touch death and create a series of photographs about pushing away the feeling of disappearing before it hits us hard in the face. 
I’m seriously not sure if this is an escape or an acceptance for me. All I know is that the photographs have a positive effect on me.

- Emir Özşahin
cross-connect:

Emir Özşahin - Pastel Deaths

I’ve lost a very close friend three years ago. I couldn’t get out of my head the image of her body covered with newspapers. While I was trying to get rid of this image, I realized that the image of her alive was fading away as well. Her last photograph shouldn’t have been like that. Or I shouldn’t have seen that photograph.
I started to think about death. I tried to make into a project how it would positively affect me to remember the deceased in the future from visual, perceptive and emotional points of view. 
This project is actually about what the deceased leave behind, how the ones left behind remember them or want to remember them more than those who pass away. With the naïve frames I will try to create, it’s about how my subconscious processes them, about the reality we know and how we try to forget what happens after death. 
By humanizing deceased animals and showing them as if they were sleeping, I tried to briefly touch death and create a series of photographs about pushing away the feeling of disappearing before it hits us hard in the face. 
I’m seriously not sure if this is an escape or an acceptance for me. All I know is that the photographs have a positive effect on me.

- Emir Özşahin
cross-connect:

Emir Özşahin - Pastel Deaths

I’ve lost a very close friend three years ago. I couldn’t get out of my head the image of her body covered with newspapers. While I was trying to get rid of this image, I realized that the image of her alive was fading away as well. Her last photograph shouldn’t have been like that. Or I shouldn’t have seen that photograph.
I started to think about death. I tried to make into a project how it would positively affect me to remember the deceased in the future from visual, perceptive and emotional points of view. 
This project is actually about what the deceased leave behind, how the ones left behind remember them or want to remember them more than those who pass away. With the naïve frames I will try to create, it’s about how my subconscious processes them, about the reality we know and how we try to forget what happens after death. 
By humanizing deceased animals and showing them as if they were sleeping, I tried to briefly touch death and create a series of photographs about pushing away the feeling of disappearing before it hits us hard in the face. 
I’m seriously not sure if this is an escape or an acceptance for me. All I know is that the photographs have a positive effect on me.

- Emir Özşahin
cross-connect:

Emir Özşahin - Pastel Deaths

I’ve lost a very close friend three years ago. I couldn’t get out of my head the image of her body covered with newspapers. While I was trying to get rid of this image, I realized that the image of her alive was fading away as well. Her last photograph shouldn’t have been like that. Or I shouldn’t have seen that photograph.
I started to think about death. I tried to make into a project how it would positively affect me to remember the deceased in the future from visual, perceptive and emotional points of view. 
This project is actually about what the deceased leave behind, how the ones left behind remember them or want to remember them more than those who pass away. With the naïve frames I will try to create, it’s about how my subconscious processes them, about the reality we know and how we try to forget what happens after death. 
By humanizing deceased animals and showing them as if they were sleeping, I tried to briefly touch death and create a series of photographs about pushing away the feeling of disappearing before it hits us hard in the face. 
I’m seriously not sure if this is an escape or an acceptance for me. All I know is that the photographs have a positive effect on me.

- Emir Özşahin
cross-connect:

Emir Özşahin - Pastel Deaths

I’ve lost a very close friend three years ago. I couldn’t get out of my head the image of her body covered with newspapers. While I was trying to get rid of this image, I realized that the image of her alive was fading away as well. Her last photograph shouldn’t have been like that. Or I shouldn’t have seen that photograph.
I started to think about death. I tried to make into a project how it would positively affect me to remember the deceased in the future from visual, perceptive and emotional points of view. 
This project is actually about what the deceased leave behind, how the ones left behind remember them or want to remember them more than those who pass away. With the naïve frames I will try to create, it’s about how my subconscious processes them, about the reality we know and how we try to forget what happens after death. 
By humanizing deceased animals and showing them as if they were sleeping, I tried to briefly touch death and create a series of photographs about pushing away the feeling of disappearing before it hits us hard in the face. 
I’m seriously not sure if this is an escape or an acceptance for me. All I know is that the photographs have a positive effect on me.

- Emir Özşahin
cross-connect:

Emir Özşahin - Pastel Deaths

I’ve lost a very close friend three years ago. I couldn’t get out of my head the image of her body covered with newspapers. While I was trying to get rid of this image, I realized that the image of her alive was fading away as well. Her last photograph shouldn’t have been like that. Or I shouldn’t have seen that photograph.
I started to think about death. I tried to make into a project how it would positively affect me to remember the deceased in the future from visual, perceptive and emotional points of view. 
This project is actually about what the deceased leave behind, how the ones left behind remember them or want to remember them more than those who pass away. With the naïve frames I will try to create, it’s about how my subconscious processes them, about the reality we know and how we try to forget what happens after death. 
By humanizing deceased animals and showing them as if they were sleeping, I tried to briefly touch death and create a series of photographs about pushing away the feeling of disappearing before it hits us hard in the face. 
I’m seriously not sure if this is an escape or an acceptance for me. All I know is that the photographs have a positive effect on me.

- Emir Özşahin
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one day trip to Arceches/Beanfort by (kygp)
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Just had my first acupuncture experience. It included bleeding and electrotherapy. All in all a pretty eventful morning.
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truebluemeandyou:

DIY Know Your Shoes Guide from Enerie here. My favorite shoes aren’t listed yet - Louis Heels which were popular in the 1920s. First seen at inspiration & realisation’s Facebook page.
truebluemeandyou:

DIY Know Your Shoes Guide from Enerie here. My favorite shoes aren’t listed yet - Louis Heels which were popular in the 1920s. First seen at inspiration & realisation’s Facebook page.
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I feel like we need some clarification